woman with half of face young and other half of face old

Mixing Myth and Science for Anti-Aging

Getting old is just another curve in the circle of life. Aging is a process none of us can escape but one many of us wish to hide....

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Getting old is just another curve in the circle of life. Aging is a process none of us can escape but one many of us wish to hide.

With age comes wisdom, prudence and insight. However, aging also comes with some undesired side effects. As the mind matures so does the body, and with time, the physical signs of aging become more and more defined. Wrinkles, crows feet and facial drooping are just a few of the less than desirable signs of aging.

In an effort to slow the aging process, many of us are turning to modern medicine. In 2011, more than 9 million cosmetic procedures were preformed in the United States. The most common non-surgical procedure preformed was Botulinum Toxin Type A injections, more commonly known as Botox.

These injections are usually inserted in the facial area to reduce the appearance of wrinkles and tighten the skin. While Botox is a popular quick fix for those wishing to get rid of wrinkles, the procedure comes with inherent dangers and unwanted side effects.

It is important to understand exactly what is involved in Botox injections. When Botox is injected, it blocks a neurotransmitter that causes muscles to move, essentially paralyzing the muscles in the face. This paralysis is the reason for wrinkle reduction and facial tightening.

Furthermore, you are injecting foreign toxic substances into your body. Our bodies are designed to fight off toxins, not ingest them and there are a host of possible side effects. Short-term side effects include muscle pain, bruising, weakness, headaches, issues with blurred or impaired vision and possible flu-like symptoms.

Long-term, you may experience muscle degeneration due to disuse. Studies have also shown that this muscle paralysis can cause cognitive problems due to the limited range of motion and lack of expressiveness in the face post procedure.

Clearly the artificial elements of Botox can be harmful to your body. Wouldn’t it be nice if there was a natural way to slow the aging process? Well, holistic thinking combined with modern technology may have found just such a fix.

In an effort to achieve younger looking skin the natural way, scientists have developed a new type of cosmetic procedure that does not involve placing any foreign substances into the body. In fact, this procedure, appropriately termed the vampire face-lift, recycles your own blood into the facial area in order to decrease the appearance of wrinkles.

While at first this may sound a bit strange, it has been in practice for a few years with many satisfied clients.

The procedure works by drawing blood out of your arm, which is then spun in a centrifuge. It separates the blood platelets and then injects them into your face. This process augments the area surrounding the injection and stimulates new collagen production to reduce the appearance of wrinkles.  

There are many advantages to using the vampire facelift instead of other procedures. First, you are recycling material from your own body so no artificial substances are injected. Second, it lasts longer and costs less than many of the other artificial methods.

So next time your thinking of ditching the wrinkles, remember the natural alternative way to stay as ageless as a vampire.

To get more information on other natural and holistic healing methods, supplements and doctors, please visit http://www.cloudninehealth.com and www.holistichealersdirectory.com

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Photo Courtesy of dermatology.com, Flickr Creative Commons 

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