woman with brown hair has her eyes closed with red petals on her forehead and cheek

Skin Cancer Index 2018, Which places in the world have more cases of skin cancer?

65

by derma.plus

Skin Cancer Index 2018

62 Nations analysed based on Skin Cancer Susceptibility and Socio-Economic Factors

  • New Zealand ranks the highest in new cases of skin cancer by population with score of the 10,00

  • Sweden is the country which has the most efficient access to cancer treatments due to a national health spending score of 4,20

  • Nigeria has the least access to skin cancer treatment therefore having a total mortality rate of 67% per capita

  • Even with a high average UV Factor of 7.54, Bangladesh has the lowest amount of new cases with a score of 1,0

Berlin, Germany- derma.plus, the platform for dermatological advice from leading physicians, has conducted an international study on skin cancer to better understand the geographical and socio-economic factors which make incidences of the disease more common in certain regions more frequently than others. Investigating 62 countries across the globe this study aims to draw attention to a various array factors influencing skin cancer cases, concerning prevalence and treatment in many different parts of the world.

Divided into two sections, the International Skin Cancer Index can be divided into the Skin Cancer Susceptibility Index and the Socio-Economic Treatment Index. The first index analyses the UV factor, the average population skin-tone and the rate of incidences from a range of countries to identify geographically where the highest rates of skin cancer are most likely to occur. The latter, cross references national health spending, access to treatment and individual income against mortality rates to better understand the efforts undertaken worldwide to combat the disease.

“Incidence of both non-melanoma and melanoma skin cancers has increased dramatically over the past decades,” states Prof. Dietrich Abeck, Chief Medical Advisor for derma.plus. “This study is indicative that a high level of UV exposure, coupled with a lighter skin tone (as calculated by the Fitzpatrick-Scale) led to a higher diagnosis of skin cancer. However on the other hand, the index reveals that countries such as New Zealand and Australia, which have some of the highest incidences of skin cancer, also have some of the lowest death rates due to high levels of health expenditure.”

Taking into account the fact that skin cancer claims a life every 10 minutes, the study aims to highlight the precautions that can be taken across the world to combat the disease. Death rates from this disease have doubled since 1990 and stakeholders such as the World Health Organization are struggling cope with the magnitude of cases and inequality of international medical care. Although the  rate at which skin cancer occurs may be high in countries with a combination of light skin tone and high UV exposure, adequate health care spending appears to be effective in keeping the mortality rate lower than in countries with fewer diagnoses and less funding for skin cancer prevention.

 

The table below shows the Top 10 countries with the most new skin cancer cases per population:

Rank

Country

Skin Cancer Incidence Score

Average UV Factor

Skin color scale

Annual Melanoma cases

1

New Zealand

10,00

6,98

4,75

2.473

2

Australia

9,67

7,35

5,75

12.265

3

Switzerland

5,89

2,80

7,75

2.484

4

Sweden

5,79

1,28

9,75

2.911

5

Norway

5,71

1,00

10,00

1.506

6

Netherlands

5,60

2,42

8,75

4.804

7

Denmark

5,57

2,23

8,25

1.596

8

Slovenia

5,19

2,99

7,50

533

9

USA

4,62

4,98

6,00

72.000

10

UK

4,60

2,33

9,25

14.445

N.B. Die Methodik, die erklärt, wie die einzelnen Faktoren untersucht wurden, finden Sie am Ende der Pressemitteilung.

The full results can be found: https://derma.plus/en/skin-cancer-index-2018/

The table below show the Top 10 countries with the least new skin cancer cases per population:

Rank

Country

Skin Cancer Incidence Score

Average UV Factor

Skin color scale

Annual Melanoma cases

1

Bangladesh

1,00

7,54

2,00

153

2

Iraq

1,00

5,64

2,75

49

3

Egypt

1,00

6,59

2,75

119

4

India

1,02

7,82

2,25

2.100

5

Pakistan

1,02

6,21

3,00

325

6

Saudi Arabia

1,02

7,35

2,75

58

7

Nigeria

1,02

9,43

1,00

436

8

Philippines

1,03

8,48

2,25

298

9

Indonesia

1,05

10,00

1,25

1.069

10

Iran

1,10

5,17

2,75

531

N.B. Die Methodik, die erklärt, wie die einzelnen Faktoren untersucht wurden, finden Sie am Ende der Pressemitteilung.

The full results can be found: https://derma.plus/en/skin-cancer-index-2018/

The table below show the Top 10 countries with the most economic contributions for skin cancer treatments:

Rank

Country

Mortality Rate

Lifetime Expectancy Inequality index

National Health Spending Score

Total Score

1

Sweden

17.00%

3,11

4,20

8,4

2

Switzerland

15.00%

3,92

2,81

8,7

3

Italy

14.00%

3,35

6,32

8,9

4

Denmark

14.00%

3,96

4,28

9,0

5

Germany

16.00%

3,68

4,93

9,2

6

Norway

22.00%

3,36

3,44

9,3

7

Australia

13.00%

4,21

4,98

9,3

8

Belgium

15.00%

3,92

5,28

9,4

9

Finland

18.00%

3,53

5,82

9,4

10

Iceland

25.00%

2,82

6,13

9,4

N.B. Die Methodik, die erklärt, wie die einzelnen Faktoren untersucht wurden, finden Sie am Ende der Pressemitteilung.

The full results can be found: https://derma.plus/en/skin-cancer-index-2018/

The table below show the Top 10 countries with the least economic contributions for skin cancer treatments:

Rank

Country

Mortality Rate

Lifetime Expectancy Inequality index

National Health Spending Score

Total Score

1

Nigeria

67.00%

40,79

9,73

57,0

2

Pakistan

63.00%

29,90

10,00

43,9

3

India

53.00%

24,97

9,47

37,5

4

South Africa

26.00%

25,73

7,84

36,6

5

Bangladesh

62.00%

20,09

9,94

32,2

6

Iraq

53.00%

17,65

9,27

29,0

7

Indonesia

51.00%

16,44

9,96

27,5

8

Philippines

46.00%

15,19

9,43

25,5

9

Brazil

32.00%

14,54

7,80

23,8

10

Egypt

45.00%

13,43

9,17

23,4

N.B. The methodology explaining how each factor was researched can be found at the bottom of the press release.

The full results can be found: https://derma.plus/en/skin-cancer-index-2018/

 

 

Further Findings:

Article credit:  https://derma.plus/en/skin-cancer-index-2018/

About derma.plus: derma.plus is a platform where clinically-experienced and established dermatologists with in-depth scientific expertise advise on a range of dermatological conditions. Providing answers to various queries, derma.plus’ trustworthy team of doctors provide answers to various queries, whilst guaranteeing high quality information reflecting the most recent research findings in the field of dermatology.

Methodology and Sources:

1)  Skin Cancer Incidence Score: We took the number of new melanoma skin cancer cases per year from the WHO Globocan Report and divided it by the population of each country to get the skin cancer incidence.

 2) Average UV-Factor: Lists the intensity of UV-radiation averaged for the year. We scaled the numbers from 1-10, with 10 being the most intense UV radiation. Based on values from the worldwide UV-Index by the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection and averaged for the year.

 3) Skin Color Scale: We used the Fitzpatrick-Scale to estimate the average skin type of the countries based on ethnic distribution, scaled from 1-10 with 10 being the lightest skin type. The average skin type can be deceptive however in countries where the ethnic distribution is largley towards the end of either spectrum.

 4) Mortality Rate: Deaths each year from melanoma skin cancer divided by the number of new cases per year. Based on data from the WHO Globocan report.

 5) Lifetime Expectancy Inequality Index: Data from the Human Development Index. Inequality in distribution of expected lifespan based on data from tables estimated using the Atkinson inequality index. The higher the number the higher the inequality.

 6) National Health Spending Score: National Health Expenditure (% GDP) and per Capita Health Expenditure ($). The lower the number, the higher the spending. Based on Data from the World Bank

 7) Score: Factors in the Mortality Rate, national inequality and the national health spending per capita as well as the national health expenditure in % of the GDP. Also using an efficiency variable that is considering the per capita expenditure in purchasing parity power in relation to the survival rate (E) R=(((H1+H2+M)/5)+(I*5)+(E/10)) //R (Ranking) , H1 (Health Expenditure in % of GDP, H2 (Health Expenditure per year per capita in constant $), M (Mortality Rate), I (Ineuality in lifetime-expectancy), E (Efficiency of Health System, Survival Rate * Per Capita Expenditure (PPP)). The lower the number, the better the ranking.

In this article